Cannabis Parody of Children’s song “This Old Man”


This old man he rolled one…

He smoked it up with his son…

With a nick nack paddy whack roll us another bone…

This old man came toking home.

This old man he rolled two.

He smoked reefer till he flew.

With a nick nack paddy whack roll us another bone.

This old man came toking home.

This old man he rolled three

outta  out of his bag og home grown trees

with a nick nack paddy whack roll us another bone…

This old man came toking home.

This old man he rolled four

because today he was so sore

with a nick nack paddy whack roll up another bone…

this old man came toking home.

This old man he rolled five

cannabis oil helps keep him alive

with a nick nack paddy wack roll us up another bone…

this old man came toking home.

This old man he rolled six,

some men need weed to stiffen their dicks

with a nick nack paddy whack his girl is comin to ride his bone….

this old man tokes in his home.

This old man he rolled seven

smoking weed helps him talk to heaven

with a nick nack paddy whack roll up another bone.

Its spiritual use up in our home.

this old man he rolled eight

just so he could eat what’s on his plate.

with a nick nack paddy whack roll up another bone.

No chronic wasting in this home.

this old man he rolled nine,

after toking out he felt just fine

with a nick nack paddy whack roll up another bone…

this old man came toking home.

this old man he rolled ten

then handed ‘em out to all his friends…

with a nick nack paddy whack roll up another bone….

this old man tokes in and out of home.

The classic children song

“This Old Man Nursery Rhymes”

This old man, he played one
He played knick-knack on my thumb
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played two
He played knick-knack on my shoe
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played three
He played knick-knack on my knee
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played four
He played knick-knack on my door
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played five
He played knick-knack on my hive
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played six
He played knick-knack on my sticks
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played seven
He played knick-knack up in heaven
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played eight
He played knick-knack on my gate
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played nine
He played knick-knack on my spine
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

This old man, he played ten
He played knick-knack once ag’n
With a knick-knack patty-whack, give a dog a bone
This old man came rolling home

more history from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Old_Man

Origins and history

The origins of this song are obscure. The earliest extant record is a version noted in Anne Gilchrist‘s Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society (1937), learnt from her Welsh nurse in the 1870s under the title “Jack Jintle” with the lyrics:

My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but one,
And I can play nick-nack upon my own thumb.
With my nick-nack and pad-lock and sing a fine song,
And all the fine ladies come dancing along.

My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but two,
And I can play nick-nack upon my own shoe.
With my nick-nack, etc.[1]

The more familiar version goes like this:

This old man, he played one,
He played knick-knack on my thumb;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played two,
He played knick-knack on my shoe;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played three,
He played knick-knack on my knee;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played four,
He played knick-knack on my door;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played five,
He played knick-knack on my hive;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played six,
He played knick-knack on my sticks;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played seven,
He played knick-knack up in heaven;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played eight,
He played knick-knack on my gate;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played nine,
He played knick-knack on my spine;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played ten,
He played knick-knack once again;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

A similar version was included in Cecil Sharp and Sabine Baring-Gould‘s English Folk-Songs for Schools, published in 1906.[2] It was collected several times in England in the early twentieth century with a variety of lyrics. In 1948 it was included by Pete Seeger and Ruth Crawford in their American Folk Songs for Children and recorded by Seeger in 1953. It received a boost in popularity when it was adapted for the 1958 film The Inn of the Sixth Happiness by composer Malcolm Arnold as “The Children’s Marching Song”, which led to hit singles for Cyril Stapleton and Mitch Miller.[3]

[edit]In popular culture

  • The song was parodied in The Two Ronnies skit The Plumstead Ladies’ Male Voice Choir, with funny verses such as: “Her old man, next to you/Needs a damn good talking to/Knick-knack, paddy-whack, now she’s in the club/He’s off boozing down the pub”; and “This old man, he played nine/He’s as bad as your’s or mine/Dick, Jack, Harry, Mack, Trevor, Doug or Mike/All old men are all alike.”
  • Columbo (Peter Falk) used to whistle this tune in several episodes.
  • In the Cheers season eleven episode “The King of Beers”, Norm awkwardly blows a job interview by complimenting his possible future boss’s pants and singing “This Old Man”, something Rebecca said she did when interviewing for her “dream job” at the House of Pancakes.
  • Nerdcore rapper MC Frontalot recorded a track on his album Nerdcore Rising by the name of “This Old Man”. The track’s refrain lines are done in the same meter and the lyrics describe an elderly rapper.
  • The song is referenced by Korn in their song “Shoots and Ladders” along with many other nursery rhymes.
  • Fiddler’s Green sang a version of “This Old Man” on their 2009’s Album “Sports Day At Killaloe” with eleven stanzas.
  • In Mad Men Season 1 Episode 4 “New Amsterdam”, Bertram Cooper whistles it after lecturing Don Draper on the company’s need to keep Pete Campbell.
  • The Wiggles covered this song with Sam Moran on Pop Go The Wiggles.
  • Barney & Friends changes this song with “I Love You”.
  • The song was heavily sampled “This Old Man” by Destiny’s Child in their song “Temptation” from their 1999 album, The Writing’s on the Wall.
  • Paddiwack Song by Ritchie Valens is a Rock and roll version of the song.

[edit]References

  1. ^ A. G. Gilchrist, “Jack Jintle”, Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, 3 (2) (1937), pp. 124–5.
  2. ^ S. B. Gould and C. J. Sharp English Folk-Songs for Schools (London: J. Curwen & Sons, 1906) pp. 94–5.
  3. ^ N. Musiker and D. Adès, Conductors and Composers of Popular Orchestral Music: a Biographical and Discographical Sourcebook (London: Greenwood, 1998), p. 248.

[edit]External links

About Breezy Kiefair

links about breezy blog http://breedheenorilleykeefer.com/ http://misshightimes.com/users/breezykiefair on youtube http://www.youtube.com/user/Mr8MrsKiefAir?feature=mhsn ~ Do all that you can to cultivate peace within yourself, that it might shine out from you, and plant the seed of peace in other spirits, for them to cultivate.~ {Remember... it is when we choose act on the issues that are in front of our faces, when we choose to get involved instead of looking the other way as our fellow man struggles, when we choose to take those small simple little actions, working on righting little wrongs in our everyday lives that really make change happen, those seemingly small actions are what really make the world a better place and are a catalyst for greater social change.} ~Both quotes by Breedheen "Bree" O'Rilley Keefer~ an interview in the 420 times http://the420times.com/2010/06/the-faces-of-medical-marijuana-an-interview-with-breez/ Cannabis Health News Magazine... see pages 37-39 http://cannabishealthnewsmagazine.com/PDF/CHNM_Feb2010_small.pdf

Posted on 2013/01/23, in American Dream, Breezy Kiefair, Cannabis, cannabis, parody, Poetry, United States and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I found this blog very great and I just wanna thank you for that. I hope you keep up the perfect work!

  2. I liked your post.Really thank you! Actually Wonderful.

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