Daily Archives: 2013/05/24

A few words on the properties of Isopropyl alcohol

A bottle of Rubbing Alcohol

A bottle of Rubbing Alcohol (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What solvent you use to create your cannabis oil is very important. If you are thinking of making your own oil, please take the time to educate yourself on the benefits and risks of any solvent you are thinking of using.  When selecting your solvent, it is essential to be as educated as possible about the properties of that solvent.

I recommend use of food grade alcohol and nothing else for beginners (because the solvent is already food grade, it is good for beginners who are learning the method… that way, IF any solvent is left behind due to inexperience, it is still safe to consume.)  Those proficient with use of alcohol as a solvent may then begin using  isopropyl alcohol 91% (rubbing alcohol) once they have learned to tell when no alcohol  remains. If you use a still, you can reclaim your solvent for reuse to cut down on costs.
Another option is moonshine if  you  have a trusted source  but note the word trusted. you want someone who has been making shine a long time with lots of living long term customers… if you get my drift

In this article, I am  posting some links about Isopropyl alcohol and the compounds they add to make it bitter (not to make it toxic) . Now for how this applies to oil making…

below follows three articles with reference links on the properties of Iso alcohol

People commonly use rubbing alcohol as a disinfectant for minor cuts and scrapes. The two most common forms of rubbing alcohol are ethyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol. Both types are extremely toxic in their concentrated forms. Because most alcoholic drinks contain ethanol, rubbing alcohol made from ethanol usually contains additives such as sucrose octaacetate and denatonium benzoate to prevent people from drinking the alcohol for pleasure.
Isopropyl Alcohol Toxicity
Isopropyl alcohol, also called isopropanol, poses many risks to human beings. Inhaled fumes can cause respiratory tract irritation at low concentrations. At higher concentrations, the fumes can affect you like a narcotic, causing drowsiness, dizziness, loss of balance, headache, unconsciousness and even death. Ingestion of isopropanol can cause unconsciousness and death as well.

The approximate lethal dose of 90 to 100 percent isopropanol for human adults is only 250 millilters or about 8 ounces. While not fatal, ingesting smaller amounts can cause gastrointestinal problems, including cramps, pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Additionally, isopropanol vapors can irritate the eyes and splashes to the eyes can even burn your corneas.

Even though you may be accustomed to rubbing isopropyl alcohol on your skin, in excessive amounts it can cause irritation and redness. It is therefore important to use the rubbing alcohol only as directed by the instructions on the bottle.

Ethyl Alcohol Toxicity
Ethyl alcohol, also called ethanol, is toxic in many of the same ways as isopropyl alcohol. Ethanol causes severe irritation of the eyes accompanied by extreme sensitivity to light. If used excessively as rubbing alcohol, it can cause irritation and redness of the skin. It may even cause cyanosis, which is a condition characterized by a blue coloration of the skin, in your extremities.

Ingestion of ethanol causes nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. The system-wide toxicity that results from ethanol ingestion can cause acidosis of the blood and central nervous system depression characterized by excitement, followed by dizziness, drowsiness and nausea. This is the feeling of ‘drunkenness’ familiar to many people who drink alcoholic beverages.

Consumption of large quantities of ethanol leads eventually to collapse, coma and possibly death by respiratory failure. Chronic ingestion of ethanol causes fetal defects and liver damage. Lastly, inhalation of concentrated ethanol fumes also causes central nervous system effects. Respiratory irritation can be followed by nausea, dizziness, headache, unconsciousness and coma. Inhalation of extreme amounts of ethanol vapors can cause death by suffocation.
Additives
People commonly drink ethyl alcohol to become intoxicated. To prevent people from drinking ethanol-based rubbing alcohol, manufacturers add chemicals to make rubbing alcohol extremely bitter and undrinkable. These additives include sucrose octaacetate and denatonium benzoate. Neither chemical is toxic; indeed, small quantities of denatonium benzoate can be put on a child’s thumb to prevent her from sucking it.

Reference : http://www.livestrong.com/article/155021-what-toxic-chemicals-are-in-rubbing-alcohol/#ixzz2UFS2vyr5

Sucrose octaacetate
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sucrose octaacetate

IUPAC name[hide]
Acetic acid [(2S,3S,4R,5R)-4-acetoxy-2,5-bis(acetoxymethyl)-2-[ [(2R,3R,4S,5R,6R)-3,4,5-triacetoxy-6- (acetoxymethyl)-2-tetrahydropyranyl]oxy]-3-tetrahydrofuranyl] ester
Identifiers
CAS number 126-14-7
PubChem 31340
Jmol-3D images Image 1
SMILES
[show]
Properties
Molecular formula C28H38O19
Molar mass 678.59 g/mol
Appearance needles
Density 1.27 g/cm3 at 16°C
Melting point
86.5°C
Boiling point
250°C at 1 mmHg
Solubility in water slightly soluble in water
Solubility soluble in ethanol, diethyl ether, acetone, benzene, chloroform[1]
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Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references
Sucrose octaacetate is an acetylated derivative of sucrose. It is used commercially and industrially in a variety of applications. It is used as an inert ingredient in pesticides and herbicides. As of December 2005 sucrose octaacetate was determined by the EPA to be completely nonharmful as an ingredient in pesticides.[2]
Sucrose octaacetate has been approved by the FDA as a food additive. It has a bitter taste which has led to its use as bitterant and an aversive agent. The chemical has also been used to determine tasters from non-tasters in mice.[3].
reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sucrose_octaacetate

Denatonium benzoate is one of the most bitter substances known. Just a few parts per million will make a product so bitter that children and pets will not be able to swallow it. Denatonium benzoate makes sweet but highly toxic products such as antifreeze and detergents taste foul. Research shows that people can detect denatonium benzoate in water at 50 parts per billion. Denatonium benzoate is bitter at 1 to 10 ppm and most products will become undrinkable at 30 to 100 ppm. Denatonium benzoate is also stable and inert. In addition, so little is needed that the properties of the product remain unchanged.

Both the National Safety Council and the American Medical Association recommend adding denatonium benzoate to products that are defined as mild to moderately toxic. Some countries, such as France, have made denatonium benzoate mandatory in antifreeze. Others such as Italy have made denatonium benzoate the number one denaturant for ethanol. The State of Oregon has required that it be added to antifreeze and windshield wiper fluid since 1995. We offer denatonium benzoate in powder form, both technical and pharmaceutical grade, and in a granular form (technical grade only). Your best source for denatonium benzoate is Aversion Technologies, the world’s only company dedicated to the supply of products to protect people, plants and pets.
reference: http://www.denatonium-benzoate.com/

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Bréedhéen O’Rilley Keefer

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Franktown, Colorado 80116

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