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Hannah Hurnard’s “Hind’s Feet on High Places” audiobook video series

hind'a feet on high places

playlist on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwc43UiVjiudD0DhoUELBfeHOamG_Hvtj

A set of videos in Tribute to the writing of Hannah Hurnard, “Hind’s Feet on High Places” to Art of Breezy Kiefair i just put music and art to a book that has been a favorite since childhood… my mother used to read me that book…. call it a tribute to her and an introduction of the book to an audience that may otherwise remain unaware of it. I recommend it for anyone with anxiety or PTSD

Preface to the allegory

The Preface chapter  to Art of Breezy Kiefair and the Music of Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

Preface to the allegory

https://plus.google.com/photos/108039434993096331483/photo/5856776704305425106

info on the book: “Hinds’ Feet on High Places” From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hinds’ Feet on High Places

Hinds’ Feet on High Places
Author(s) Hannah Hurnard
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Christian
Publisher Christian Literature Crusade
Publication date 1955
Media type Print (Hardback &Paperback)
Pages 158 pp.
ISBN ISBN 0 86065 192 4

Hinds’ Feet on High Places is an allegorical novel by English author Hannah HurnardHinds’ Feet was written in 1955 and has become a very successful work of Christian fiction, seeing new editions published as recently as July, 2005.

Plot introduction[edit]

It is the story of a young woman named Much Afraid, and her journey away from her Fearing family and into the High Places of the Shepherd, guided by her two companions Sorrow and Suffering. It is an allegory of a Christian devotional life from salvation through maturity. It aims to show how a Christian is transformed from unbeliever to immature believer to mature believer, who walks daily with God as easily on the High Places of Joy in the spirit as in the daily life of mundane and often humiliating tasks that may cause Christians to lose perspective.

The book takes its title from Habakkuk 3:19, “The Lord God is my strength, and he will make my feet like hinds’ feet, and he will make me to walk upon mine high places.”

The story begins in the Valley of Humiliation with Much Afraid, being beset by the unwanted advances of her cousin, Craven Fear, who wishes to marry her. The Family of Fearings seems to have some strong similarities to the Addams Family. Much Afraid is ugly from all outward appearances, walking on club feet, sporting gnarled, deformed hands, and speaking from a crooked mouth that seems to have been made so by a stroke or the like.

The Good Shepherd is tender and gentle with Much Afraid, especially in the beginning. However, His many sudden departures may strike the reader as bizarre, given the human penchant to expect kindly souls to never do everything that may be interpreted as rude or as hurtful in any way. Yet, though the Shepherd leaves in a moment, He returns the same way at the first furtive cry of the forlorn little protagonist. “Come, Shepherd, for I am much afraid!”

When Much Afraid intimates that she would love to be able to dance upon the high places as do the surefooted deer, the Shepherd commends her for this desire. In order to accomplish this, he offers to “plant the seed of love” into her heart. At first sight of the long, black hawthorne-looking seed, she shrieks in fear. Soon, she relents, and after the initial intense pain, she senses that something is indeed different in her, though she still looks the same, for now.

Just when the reader thinks that Much Afraid is about to reach the High Places, the path turns downward towards a seemingly endless desert. There is incident with an extremely high cliff that must be ascended by a steep, slippery and very narrow zig-zagging track, with the help of her two companions, Sorrow and Suffering. Then days are spent in a forest that is shrouded in a thick cloud of fog. During this time Much Afraid is sequestered with her two friends in a log cabin. The climax is an unexpected twist that comes as Much Afraid despairs of ever reaching the High Places.

Allusions/references to other works[edit|edit source]

The book bears some stylistic similarities to John Bunyan‘s The Pilgrim’s Progress. The name of the protagonist, Much-Afraid, also appears first in Bunyan’s work.

References[edit]

Bosman, Ellen. “Hind’s Feet on High Places” in Masterplots II: Christian Literature. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 2007: 779-782. Bezzina, Christopher Felix. ‘Journey to the High Places. Hannah Hurnard’s Spirituality and the Song of Songs.’http://www.amazon.com/Journey-High-Places-Hurnards-Spirituality/dp/1620320983

Related articles

A few words on the properties of Isopropyl alcohol

A bottle of Rubbing Alcohol

A bottle of Rubbing Alcohol (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What solvent you use to create your cannabis oil is very important. If you are thinking of making your own oil, please take the time to educate yourself on the benefits and risks of any solvent you are thinking of using.  When selecting your solvent, it is essential to be as educated as possible about the properties of that solvent.

I recommend use of food grade alcohol and nothing else for beginners (because the solvent is already food grade, it is good for beginners who are learning the method… that way, IF any solvent is left behind due to inexperience, it is still safe to consume.)  Those proficient with use of alcohol as a solvent may then begin using  isopropyl alcohol 91% (rubbing alcohol) once they have learned to tell when no alcohol  remains. If you use a still, you can reclaim your solvent for reuse to cut down on costs.
Another option is moonshine if  you  have a trusted source  but note the word trusted. you want someone who has been making shine a long time with lots of living long term customers… if you get my drift

In this article, I am  posting some links about Isopropyl alcohol and the compounds they add to make it bitter (not to make it toxic) . Now for how this applies to oil making…

below follows three articles with reference links on the properties of Iso alcohol

People commonly use rubbing alcohol as a disinfectant for minor cuts and scrapes. The two most common forms of rubbing alcohol are ethyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol. Both types are extremely toxic in their concentrated forms. Because most alcoholic drinks contain ethanol, rubbing alcohol made from ethanol usually contains additives such as sucrose octaacetate and denatonium benzoate to prevent people from drinking the alcohol for pleasure.
Isopropyl Alcohol Toxicity
Isopropyl alcohol, also called isopropanol, poses many risks to human beings. Inhaled fumes can cause respiratory tract irritation at low concentrations. At higher concentrations, the fumes can affect you like a narcotic, causing drowsiness, dizziness, loss of balance, headache, unconsciousness and even death. Ingestion of isopropanol can cause unconsciousness and death as well.

The approximate lethal dose of 90 to 100 percent isopropanol for human adults is only 250 millilters or about 8 ounces. While not fatal, ingesting smaller amounts can cause gastrointestinal problems, including cramps, pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Additionally, isopropanol vapors can irritate the eyes and splashes to the eyes can even burn your corneas.

Even though you may be accustomed to rubbing isopropyl alcohol on your skin, in excessive amounts it can cause irritation and redness. It is therefore important to use the rubbing alcohol only as directed by the instructions on the bottle.

Ethyl Alcohol Toxicity
Ethyl alcohol, also called ethanol, is toxic in many of the same ways as isopropyl alcohol. Ethanol causes severe irritation of the eyes accompanied by extreme sensitivity to light. If used excessively as rubbing alcohol, it can cause irritation and redness of the skin. It may even cause cyanosis, which is a condition characterized by a blue coloration of the skin, in your extremities.

Ingestion of ethanol causes nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. The system-wide toxicity that results from ethanol ingestion can cause acidosis of the blood and central nervous system depression characterized by excitement, followed by dizziness, drowsiness and nausea. This is the feeling of ‘drunkenness’ familiar to many people who drink alcoholic beverages.

Consumption of large quantities of ethanol leads eventually to collapse, coma and possibly death by respiratory failure. Chronic ingestion of ethanol causes fetal defects and liver damage. Lastly, inhalation of concentrated ethanol fumes also causes central nervous system effects. Respiratory irritation can be followed by nausea, dizziness, headache, unconsciousness and coma. Inhalation of extreme amounts of ethanol vapors can cause death by suffocation.
Additives
People commonly drink ethyl alcohol to become intoxicated. To prevent people from drinking ethanol-based rubbing alcohol, manufacturers add chemicals to make rubbing alcohol extremely bitter and undrinkable. These additives include sucrose octaacetate and denatonium benzoate. Neither chemical is toxic; indeed, small quantities of denatonium benzoate can be put on a child’s thumb to prevent her from sucking it.

Reference : http://www.livestrong.com/article/155021-what-toxic-chemicals-are-in-rubbing-alcohol/#ixzz2UFS2vyr5

Sucrose octaacetate
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sucrose octaacetate

IUPAC name[hide]
Acetic acid [(2S,3S,4R,5R)-4-acetoxy-2,5-bis(acetoxymethyl)-2-[ [(2R,3R,4S,5R,6R)-3,4,5-triacetoxy-6- (acetoxymethyl)-2-tetrahydropyranyl]oxy]-3-tetrahydrofuranyl] ester
Identifiers
CAS number 126-14-7
PubChem 31340
Jmol-3D images Image 1
SMILES
[show]
Properties
Molecular formula C28H38O19
Molar mass 678.59 g/mol
Appearance needles
Density 1.27 g/cm3 at 16°C
Melting point
86.5°C
Boiling point
250°C at 1 mmHg
Solubility in water slightly soluble in water
Solubility soluble in ethanol, diethyl ether, acetone, benzene, chloroform[1]
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Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references
Sucrose octaacetate is an acetylated derivative of sucrose. It is used commercially and industrially in a variety of applications. It is used as an inert ingredient in pesticides and herbicides. As of December 2005 sucrose octaacetate was determined by the EPA to be completely nonharmful as an ingredient in pesticides.[2]
Sucrose octaacetate has been approved by the FDA as a food additive. It has a bitter taste which has led to its use as bitterant and an aversive agent. The chemical has also been used to determine tasters from non-tasters in mice.[3].
reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sucrose_octaacetate

Denatonium benzoate is one of the most bitter substances known. Just a few parts per million will make a product so bitter that children and pets will not be able to swallow it. Denatonium benzoate makes sweet but highly toxic products such as antifreeze and detergents taste foul. Research shows that people can detect denatonium benzoate in water at 50 parts per billion. Denatonium benzoate is bitter at 1 to 10 ppm and most products will become undrinkable at 30 to 100 ppm. Denatonium benzoate is also stable and inert. In addition, so little is needed that the properties of the product remain unchanged.

Both the National Safety Council and the American Medical Association recommend adding denatonium benzoate to products that are defined as mild to moderately toxic. Some countries, such as France, have made denatonium benzoate mandatory in antifreeze. Others such as Italy have made denatonium benzoate the number one denaturant for ethanol. The State of Oregon has required that it be added to antifreeze and windshield wiper fluid since 1995. We offer denatonium benzoate in powder form, both technical and pharmaceutical grade, and in a granular form (technical grade only). Your best source for denatonium benzoate is Aversion Technologies, the world’s only company dedicated to the supply of products to protect people, plants and pets.
reference: http://www.denatonium-benzoate.com/

  • Alcohol (yournaturalguide.wordpress.com)

Questions?

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email: breezyorilley@gmail.com
snail mail:

Bréedhéen O’Rilley Keefer

P.O. Box 849

Franktown, Colorado 80116

Pink Floyd Animals, Art, Activism

The piece is really a self portrait about my activism journey/personal life 2009-2012 set to the pink floyd animals album. im thinking the subtle message may be too personal and understated for most to “get it”

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animals_(Pink_Floyd_album)

Another version of this video will be uploaded soon.

Colorado Color to “Lenny” Song by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble

Colorado Color to “Lenny” Song by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble from the album Texas

A Drive through the Colorado Fall Color 2012 to the music of:

Lenny (instrumental)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Lenny”
Song by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble from the album Texas Flood
Released June 13, 1983
Recorded November 24, 1982
Genre Electric blues
Blues rock
Length 4:59
Label Epic Records
Writer Stevie Ray Vaughan
Texas Flood track listing
“I’m Cryin'”
(9) “Lenny”
(10)
“Lenny” is the tenth and final track on the first Stevie Ray Vaughan album Texas Flood. The song is in 4/4 time and notated in the key of E major (but instruments are tuned down a half-step). It is played very slowly and freely, with Vaughan alternating between jazz-inflected chords and solo runs. The style is influenced by Jimi Hendrix ballads like “Little Wing” and “Angel”.[1] The song itself was written and named for his wife at the time, Lenora. Vaughan also named one of his guitars “Lenny”, which he used to play this song and also “Riviera Paradise”. The song was often played at live shows.
[edit]References

^ Kitts, Jeff, ed. (1997). Guitar World Presents Stevie Ray Vaughan: … from the Pages of Guitar World Magazine. Hal Leonard. p. 128. ISBN 0793580803.

ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenny_(instrumental)

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